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mining Kerry McKenzie, Anna and Trish Ferguson Hellen Manski and Sophie Pezzutti Darlene Radlingmayr and Michelle Bradshaw Port Therese Foley and Joanne Truelson (L-R)Dorothy and Frank Wilson and Sheena James (L-R)Laura Mahoney, Min Lau and Jill Stephenson (L-R)`Dorothy Wilson, Leonie Geary and Sally Pescini Bhabie and Paul Dickens with Pauls "Iron Maiden" Steve Beale and Chris Dunphy, MIPEC Melissa Power, Emma Hardgreave and Geri Lanko Jack Wood with NAO which has a range of senses for natural interaction including moving, feeling, hearing and speaking, seeing, connecting and thinking. Aboutusgenericimage_3 Aboutusgeneric_1
mining Kerry McKenzie, Anna and Trish Ferguson Hellen Manski and Sophie Pezzutti Darlene Radlingmayr and Michelle Bradshaw Port Therese Foley and Joanne Truelson (L-R)Dorothy and Frank Wilson and Sheena James (L-R)Laura Mahoney, Min Lau and Jill Stephenson (L-R)`Dorothy Wilson, Leonie Geary and Sally Pescini Bhabie and Paul Dickens with Pauls "Iron Maiden" Steve Beale and Chris Dunphy, MIPEC Melissa Power, Emma Hardgreave and Geri Lanko Jack Wood with NAO which has a range of senses for natural interaction including moving, feeling, hearing and speaking, seeing, connecting and thinking.

Work underway in the Galilee
Senator says camps, airstrips, rail and head office moving ahead for Adani
Wednesday 05 July 2017  

Federal Resources Minister Matt Canavan says work has begun at the proposed Carmichael mega-mine in the Galilee.

In June, the board of Adani made a public commitment to build the mine, providing they can secure financing for the $16 billion to $22 billion mine and rail project.

That may not be easy, with green groups launching coordinated attacks on banks they think could be considering investing in the project. Today 11 branches of the Commonwealth were forced to close because of anti-Adani protests.

However, in the short term, Adani expects to spend around seventy million dollars on pre-construction work before summer, which Senator Canavan said he had seen first-hand this week.

“I went out there with Lachlan Miller and Michelle landry, and they are moving on very quickly, and that’s great,” he told the ABC

“They have a 245 man camp; they will be filling it up very soon to start early works on their workshops and also an airstrip.

“Work is also about to start on building a 1200 man camp to support the construction work that is coming up, and early works on the railway will start soon."

Away from the mine itself, Mr Canavan has also said Adani has begun mobilising its workforce in Townsville.

After first announcing their intention to make Townsville their base in 2016, they opened their chosen venue in Townsville on the same day they made their final investment decision in June.

“The people that came up with me are Brisbane based at the moment, but they are moving their families up to Townsville,” Senator Canavan said.

“Which is positive for our nation that the headquarters for a major company will be in a regional city.”

Meanwhile the next potential mega-mine off the rank in the Galilee - GVK Hancock’s proposed Kevin’s Corner Project - had a decisive win in the Land Court this week clearing the way for a mining lease to be approved.

Nearby grazier Bruce Currie challenged the mine in the court on the basis that it will destroy the local groundwater aquifers and therefore his livelihood.

However while acknowledging there will be costs, the court decided the benefits would be greater.

“Inevitably ... mining projects of this magnitude will have negative impacts and undesired consequences on the environment, particularly in the immediate vicinity of the mine,” the Land Court ruled

“However I have come to the view that those consequences are outweighed by the benefits that will flow from the development of the mine.”

However, Mr Currie said he would continue to fight.

“In 20,30 or 60 years these projects will be finished,” he told the ABC.

"All that will be left is a big hole in the ground, all the coal, all the jobs and all the businesses will be gone, and at the end of the day, we are destroying our groundwater.

"We have to make some mature decisions about what we are going to do as a society.”

 

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