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csg Best and Fairest was won by Rhys Giles dragline (L-R) Crushettes Best Back was Tasma Vesey (L-R) Megan Smith was named Best Utility, seen with Coaching staff Crushettes Coaches Award was won by Samantha Evans mining Best forward for Crushettes was Lauren Pingel Steve Beale and Chris Dunphy, MIPEC Crushettes Rookie of the Year was won by Zoe Mackay Jo-Anne Burke, DB Scaffolding; Susan McGuire, Mayogroup Crushettes Players Player was Michelle Cummings csg Aboutusgeneric_1 Best and Fairest was won by Rhys Giles
csg Best and Fairest was won by Rhys Giles dragline (L-R) Crushettes Best Back was Tasma Vesey (L-R) Megan Smith was named Best Utility, seen with Coaching staff Crushettes Coaches Award was won by Samantha Evans mining Best forward for Crushettes was Lauren Pingel Steve Beale and Chris Dunphy, MIPEC Crushettes Rookie of the Year was won by Zoe Mackay Jo-Anne Burke, DB Scaffolding; Susan McGuire, Mayogroup Crushettes Players Player was Michelle Cummings csg

Mine to reopen with mixed workforce
GLOBAL commodity trader banking on sustainable coal price recovery
Wednesday 12 October 2016  

Glencore has announced it will use a mix of full-time, contractor, and labour hire staff to fill 200 new roles at its Collinsville coal mine.

Glencore will expand production at the mine, suggesting they think the recent rally in coal prices has set a more sustainable floor price for both thermal and coking coal into the future.

Australian coking coal spot prices have surged 155 percent since the start of June to a four-year high of $282 per tonne following production declines in China.

The recruitment campaign at Collinsville reverses a decision back in April to make 180 people - or 80% of the Collinsville workforce - redundant as the company sought to reduce their coal output because of a global oversupply.

Tony Galvin, head of Glencore’s open cut coal business in Queensland, acknowledged that the last three years required some difficult decisions.

“While Glencore has scaled back production at Collinsville this year, we have continued to assess a range of options for the mine in conjunction with monitoring coal market demand,” he said.

“We are now seeing increased demand from South-East Asia for the specific type of coal produced by Collinsville.

“Our Collinsville mine has made material progress in increasing operational efficiencies and reducing costs in the current market and the decision to return to production is positive news for the local community and the wider region."

According to Glencore, the increased production at Collinsville won’t raise their overall Australian coal exports because it will be more than offset by the recent closures of their underground mines at Newlands and West Wallsend in NSW.

Glencore first flagged the closing of the Newlands underground mine more than two years ago, and about 100 people finished up at the mine in May, with the mine sealed completely in August.

 

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