It's more than just an excellent news service.

It's about becoming part of the mining and gas community.

Subscribing to Shift Miner means you can get full access to all our news and special reports, advertise anything you want in the classifieds (print & digital) and browse the jobs board.

So no matter where your job takes you, you're just a click away from the best source of mining information on mobile, in print and online.

DIGITAL SUBSCRIPTION: $4.99 a week
Includes full access to all areas on smartphone*, ipad and online.
*Download the free iphone app from itunes

STILL NOT SURE?
Click here to sign up for our free news headlines service: The WINO (Wednesday’s Industrial News Online)

Email [username]:

Name:

Coupon Code:
Leave blank if you don't have one
Password:

Confirm Password:

Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy
csg Uncle Randolf and Lynda Connell with footballs painted by Angus Row Row dragline mine Steve Beale and Chris Dunphy, MIPEC Trent Johnston – QLD Axemans Association fifo mining Aboutusgeneric_2 csg Taylor Malone and Aleithia Row Row Jo-Anne Burke, DB Scaffolding; Susan McGuire, Mayogroup Corey Lund, Mikayla and Jeanine Peckett (L-R)Tyce , Lauren Pingel and Tashia Marshall Under 17 teams
csg Uncle Randolf and Lynda Connell with footballs painted by Angus Row Row dragline mine Steve Beale and Chris Dunphy, MIPEC Trent Johnston – QLD Axemans Association fifo mining Aboutusgeneric_2 csg Taylor Malone and Aleithia Row Row Jo-Anne Burke, DB Scaffolding; Susan McGuire, Mayogroup Corey Lund, Mikayla and Jeanine Peckett

It’s good technology but sorry
GOVERNMENT concedes achievements of UCG miner in QLD but no change on policy
Wednesday 24 August 2016  

The Queensland Chief Scientist has acknowledged the unique technological achievements of Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) company Carbon Energy and has echoed comments that UCG will “undoubtedly” be a big part of the world's energy sources in the future.

In a written letter to Carbon Energy, chief scientist Dr Geoff Barrett has officially confirmed that the approach proposed by Carbon Energy to safely decommission and rehabilitate UCG sites was accepted as safe by an Independent Scientific Panel set up to decide which UCG projects could move forward in Queensland.

While the acknowledgement is some return on the company's investment in developing its UCG technologies, it does not change their commercial outlook following the Palaszczuk government's shock decision in April to ban UCG in Queensland.

Carbon Energy was originally spun out of Australia’s biggest science organisation the CSIRO, with many of its lead technical people previously recognised scientists working for the government. However, the decision was a complete surprise to the management and left them almost futureless overnight.

In receiving the acknowledgement, Chairman Dr Chris Rawlings said it would help them use the technology overseas.

“Dr Garrett’s letter clearly acknowledges Carbon Energy as the only company to successfully complete any of the ISP’s recommendations and also notes our keyseam technology as being different from any other,” he said.

“While this acknowledgement does not reverse the decision to operate UCG in the State....it lays the path to assist other nations, such as China, recognise that keyseam has been rigorously tested under the highest standards, using robust science-based controls.”

Among the options being explored by the company to remain in business, are setting up another trial site in China in a joint venture with the Chinese government, licensing its technology to a company trying to do something similar in Indonesia, and the possibility of converting their Queensland Bloodwood Creek UCG site to a solar energy project in partnership with Photon Energy.

However, neither of those projects are likely if it can’t solve the most pressing problem of refinancing a $10 million loan set to mature early next year.

Carbon Energy’s share price has fallen from $0.25 a share in 2011 to $0.01 today.

Despites its promise as a cost effective way to exploit the world's vast stranded coal seams which are too deep to mine conventionally, the technologies development has been plagued by concerns about the environmental dangers of the process.

The now defunct Linc Energy is currently being pursued by the state government over claims by government that they were negligent in letting dangerous chemicals leak into the surrounding aquifers.

 

Similar Topics